Funding Opportunity: Empower Children and Families to Make Healthy Food Choices

Funding Overview

Support effective programs, projects and policies that:

  1. Increase individual knowledge and skills regarding the purchase and preparation of healthy foods.
  2. Increase consumer demand for healthy food and beverages.
  3. Empower individuals and families to easily make healthy food choices and decrease consumption of unhealthy food.

Specifically, we are interested in receiving proposals for:

  • Skills-based nutrition/cooking classes and activities that empower individuals to choose, purchase and prepare healthy food.

Grant Deadline: Not accepting applications. This work is in progress.

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Have questions? Contact your Program Officer for more information.

Preference was given to proposals serving low-income children and their families and caregivers in the top 10 regions with high rates of childhood obesity (as defined by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment's Health Statistics Regions). These regions have rates of childhood obesity ranging from 13.6 to 26.2 percent (most recent data available). This includes the following regions:

  • Region 4 (El Paso County)
  • Region 6 (Huerfano, Las Animas, Crowley, Otero, Bent, Kiowa, Prowers and Baca counties)
  • Region 7 (Pueblo County)
  • Region 9 (Dolores, Montezuma, San Juan, La Plata and Archuleta counties)
  • Region 12 (Garfield, Eagle, Pitkin, Grand, and Summit counties)
  • Region 13 (Lake, Chaffee, Fremont and Custer counties)
  • Region 14 (Adams County)
  • Region 15 (Arapahoe County)
  • Region 20 (Denver County)
  • Region 21 (Jefferson County)

To be considered for funding, applicants demonstrated within the grant application how they meet the following criteria:

  • Preference was given to proposals serving low-income children and their families and caregivers in the top 10 regions with high rates of childhood obesity (as defined by CDPHE’s Health Statistics Regions). These regions have rates of childhood obesity ranging from 13.6 to 26.2 percent (most recent data available). This includes the following regions:
  • Projects were required to target low-income* children and youth age 0 to 14 as well as their parents, guardians, child care providers and others with daily or otherwise significant decision-making authority impacting child/youth access to and consumption of food and beverages. Other indicators of low-income will be considered.
  • Projects were evidence-based, evidence-informed or best practice approaches that have demonstrated success in behavior change. Projects were required to demonstrate a reasonable strategy to effectively measure and evaluate outcomes.
  • Projects demonstrated the capacity and an effective strategy for reaching and serving a significant proportion of the target population.
  • Projects addressed a documented community need and interest, and be culturally and economically relevant for the population served.
  • Projects demonstrated a strategy for meaningful collaboration with appropriate community partners to ensure coordination and prevent duplication of efforts.
  • Projects demonstrated the ability to leverage diverse funding sources and have a plan for sustainability by the end of the funding period. A maximum of three years of funding was considered for projects.

* Low-income can be defined as those families eligible for nutrition assistance programs (Supplemental Nutrition and Assistance Program (SNAP) and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and families with children eligible for free and reduced school meals).